How Two Rabbis Stole Christmas Traditions To Invent Hanukkah As A Competing Jewish Holiday | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED X-Frame-Options: SAMEORIGIN

How Two Rabbis Stole Christmas Traditions To Invent Hanukkah As A Competing Jewish Holiday

Two Cincinnati rabbis — who felt that Jews in America needed a holiday of their own to compete with Christmas — are responsible for contriving and popularizing Hanukkah in America, according to Dianne Ashton, a professor of religion studies at Rowan University:

In an editorial published by the independent media website, The Conversation, Ashton explains that outside of America, Hanukkah is regarded as a minor Jewish holiday.

In the decades after the Civil War, Rabbi Isaac M. Wise of Plum Street Temple and Rabbi Max Lilienthal of Mound Street Temple introduced Hanukkah festivals to their congregations and promoted them in their publications to Jews across the nation.

“Through their efforts, special Hanukkah events for children became standard in American synagogues,” Ashton wrote.

Hanukkah, with its many variant spellings, is the Hebrew word for “dedication.”

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