"If you want the victims of gun crime to be able to sue the gun makers for damages, then let us also allow the victims of drunk driving accidents to sue the car makers and distilleries as well. While we are at it, revoke the special protection granted to vaccine makers that was passed as part of the Homeland Security Act so that people who are actually harmed by poorly made vaccines can sue the pharmaceutical companies. And, given that at least 90% of these mass shootings were committed by people either on or withdrawing from prescription anti-depressants, the victims of those shootings should be allowed to sue the pharmaceutical companies as well. Let's sue the makers of kitchen cutlery for every stabbing death. Let's sue the makers of sporting equipment for every victim beaten to death with a baseball bat, and tool companies for making the hammers used on bludgeoning deaths as well. The family of everyone who dies by electrocution should be allowed to sue the electric company. The family of everyone who dies in a fall should be allowed to sue the makers of ladders and staircases. The family of everyone who commits suicide by hanging should be allowed to sue the rope companies. " -- Michael Rivero

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Last week, several media reports suggested that Saudi Arabia was on the verge of a "mega deal" with the United States.

Bombastic phrases like a "mega deal" or a "grand bargain" are being used because the agreement would bring the US and the Saudis closer in significant ways, including in a mutual defense pact and through cooperation on emerging technologies like artificial intelligence and a civilian nuclear program.

General Vladimir Kulishov, First Deputy Director and Head of Russia’s Federal Security Service’s (FSB) Border Service, has accused NATO of gearing up for potential nuclear strikes on Russian soil. 

Kulishov’s accusations come amidst mounting tensions between the Kremlin and the Western military alliance, fueling concerns of a new Cold War era.

The Biden administration is pressuring Britain, France, and other nations to halt their plans to censure Iran at the upcoming  International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Board of Governors meeting in June. This action is prompted by the disconcerting fact that Iran’s nuclear program has made significant strides. This situation is exacerbated by the regime’s persistent non-cooperation and lack of transparency with the IAEA, which demands immediate attention.